Daniel Weil, the Pentagram designer known for his thoughtful reinterpretations of everyday objects, believes that it’s time for a second renaissance. “It’s a participation sport, and millions of people play it,” he told Co.Design. “But at the top end, competitive players are simply extraordinary performers.”

World Chess Candidates Match in London, where the new chess set was unveiled. 

World Chess Candidates Match in London, where the new chess set was unveiled. 

Every performer needs a good stage, so at the request of the World Chess Federation, Weil undertook an overhaul of the Staunton set earlier this year. His contribution to the long line of chess sets debuted at the World Chess Candidates Tournament in London last week, which ended up being a historic and theatrical event (some even called the proceedings “bizarre”). Weil couldn’t be happier with the drama: according to him and his client, the biggest challenge with bringing people back to chess is conveying the excitement. “The biggest hurdle is in keeping it engaging, he says. “That’s the first step.”

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